The Second Wave Of Reservists

Sledmere Cross Memorial with WW1 Soldiers as Crusaders

Sledmere Cross Memorial with WW1 Soldiers as Crusaders

The number of those going to the front gathers pace every day. Apart from those we have written about already, we see from the article below that there are several more Reservists and Territorials who have joined up, as well as two from the Yeomanry, leaving resultant gaps in the lives of their families and friends.

Fred Burgess (‘E. Burgess’ on Roll of Honour)

{No trace of a Burgess family in the censuses or trade directories.}

Alfred Cook (lower Doiley)

Driver Army Service Corps 246 Company, serving under Lt Col H L Cooper Territorial  who went to war before 14 Aug 1914 (Andover Advertiser 14 Aug 1914)

Known from the Andover Advertiser to be from ‘Doiley’; confirmed from 1911 census to be an under-carter born in Market Lavington, living with his parents Leonard and Matilda (also from Wiltshire) at Lower Doiley, Hurstbourne Tarrant. No obvious SMB connection.

Herbert Cooper

Presumably the ‘H.Cooper’ of the Roll of Honour. Not on census or in trade directories. 235 possibilities in the National Archives.

The Revd Ewart Culley

Driver T4/056532 Army Service Corps 246 Company, serving under Lt Col H L Cooper. He was the grandson of George Culley (1832-1875) who came to farm in St Mary Bourne some time in the 1850s, and the brother of George and Wyndham who continued the farming business. Ewart himself became a Methodist minister and was sent to the Americas.

George Davis

Born about 1882, the son of Charles and Emily. On his mother’s side, he was descended from Thomas Kercher, with a connection to St Mary Bourne going back to the early 1700s. He was a driver with the Army Service Corps who had enlisted in 1908.

Now the subject of this post.

{Edward}Frank Day

b1897   son of Mr and Mrs George Day of Lower Rank (Andover Advertiser 4 Dec 1914)
Wessex Army Service Corps (number not known at present)

Fred Day

Frederick Day was the subject of this post.

Sidney Gunnell

Sidney Gunnell was the subject of this post

Harry Hibberd

Henry Hibberd was a sergeant in the Army Service Corps 246 Company, serving under Lt Col H L Cooper. Born in 1882,  he was one of three sons of Hector and Clara.

William Moorse

Born in 1886, one of seven children of William and Esther, William was attested by Lt Col H L Cooper in 1908 as he joined the Territorials.

Norman Neale

Born in 1890, the son of James John and Helena, Norman signed up for the Hampshire Yeomanry, but later transferred first to the Hampshire Regiment and then the Royal Engineers. The Neale family were the subject of this post.

Roland Neale

Born in 1894, the son of James John and Helena, it has not yet proved possible to establish in which unit he served, but in view of the Andover Advertiser article, the likelihood is that he signed up to the Hampshire Yeomanry with his brother (there was also a Berkshire Yeomanry etc). The Neale family were the subject of this post.

J Penny (Binley)

Presumably John Penny born 1893, son of John Penny, both carters from Wiltshire on a Binley farm. Corporal Army Service Corps 246 Company, serving under Lt Col H L Cooper.

Edwin Pike

Edwin Pike was the subject of this post.

James Pike

James Pike was the subject of this post.

Joseph Purver

Joseph Purver was the subject of this post.

Alfred Randall

Driver Alfred William Randall went on active service in 246 Company Army Service Corps, serving under Lieut. Col. H. L. Cooper, commanding 29th Divisional Train.

The Randalls come from an interesting Hampshire family with long connections to the Bourne Valley, and will be the subject of an imminent post.

Ernest Randall

Trumpeter Ernest Charles Randall went on active service in 246 Company Army Service Corps, serving under Lieut. Col. H. L. Cooper, commanding 29th Divisional Train.

The Randalls come from an interesting Hampshire family with long connections to the Bourne Valley, and will be the subject of an imminent post.

Walter Sims

Walter Sims was the subject of this post.

Fred Wedge

Frederick Wedge was one of many children of Frederick Wedge and Elizabeth née Goodyear, with a long local ancestry. He will also be the subject of an imminent post.

Capture

Andover Advertiser, 14 August 1914


Notes

I am indebted to Julie Muirhead for her discovery of the Andover Advertiser article.

This entry was posted in Families by layanglicana. Bookmark the permalink.

About layanglicana

Author of books on Calcutta, Delhi and Dar es Salaam, I am now blogging as a lay person about the Church of England and the Anglican Communion. I am also blogging about the effects of World War One on the village of St Mary Bourne, Hampshire.

4 thoughts on “The Second Wave Of Reservists

  1. Having done a great deal of research on our own First World War memorial, I know the frustration in trying to pin down where and who someone served with. There are several names on our memorial which we can’t trace and the why’s of them are lost as those generations who knew them are dead and the civic archives that documented them are lost as authorities have merged.

    Of the 143 War dead, only three remain outstanding, we’re still working on identifying them, as well as working on the WW2 elements, particularly the civilian war dead of that war, who fortunately for us have been quite well documented by the old London County Council and whose records are online.

    There are one or two strange entries where individuals who didn’t live in the town are on the memorial. One is a son of landed gentry from Scotland, who attended a public school locally and enjoyed some success in the military, rising to the rank of Major and being awarded the Military Cross and Bar. Others are from a wider field, who had formerly lived in the town, but had moved away, I suspect that their family connections had their names put onto the memorial.

    In some cases, peoples sacrifice in commemorated in more than one place, which no doubt it repeated across the country, where people had allegiances, family connections or lived and worked in different places through time. Unravelling these connections is beyond our resources.

  2. Thank-you for this, Ernie. It is encouraging to know that we are not the only ones having difficulties! And you are such an ace at this that I know I am probably not being more than usually dense. There are moments when I feel like Sherlock Holmes’s idiot sister…

    We definitely have some with family connections – there is one from Transvaal in South Africa, and the son of one of our ‘gentry’ had also been in Transvaal. I think that those that were paying for the pot of paint felt entitled to call the tune.

    I’m jealous of you being covered by the London records in some cases – they do seem to be really good, judging from one or two of my trees.

  3. Pingback: Fears of the Ladies’ Committee are Realised | St Mary Bourne Goes To War

  4. Pingback: Frederick William Wedge: The Brick Kiln Or The Baker’s Oven? | St Mary Bourne Goes To War

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